Leikeli47 / Yung Baby Tate Velvet Underground, Toronto ON, March 25

Leikeli47 / Yung Baby Tate Velvet Underground, Toronto ON, March 25
Photo: Lindsay Duncan
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There was no shortage of makeshift paisley-printed balaclavas last night at the Velvet Underground, but there was only one that mattered: Brooklyn rapper Leikeli47's.
 
Performing her first show in Toronto since she first came onto the scene in 2012, the sold-out concert brought forth an array of characters, including opening act Yung Baby Tate.
 
The young Atlanta artist, who recently took part in Dreamville's "Revenge of the Dreamers II" sessions, commanded the stage with sexual freedom often hidden in new talents — however, she fearlessly commanded the stage and performed "Bugaboo," "Freaky Girl" and "Wild Girl," all the while twerking where it felt right and engaging the crowd with comedic conversation.
 
With fans already forming dance circles from Yung Baby Tate's set, Leikeli47, decked in a black paisley balaclava and hoodie, took the stage performing her 2016 cut "C&C" before dipping "Bitch Switch." It was an early gift for diehard fans who've been following the Brooklyn rapper's career for years, but new fans sparked up as Leikeli47 started performing songs from Wash & Set, as well as her recent 2018 release Acrylic. Swerving in and out of the two albums, Leikeli47 performed crowd favourites "O.M.C.," "Miss Me," "Attitude" and "No Reload," while inviting fans on stage to give their best voguing and whacking performances to "Hit That Pose," "Wash & Set" and "Look."
 
For the Toronto crowd, the patois-infused songs "Tick Boom" and "Don't Do It" provided a special moment of unity for West Indians in the venue, while "Girl Blunt" and "Money" unified the whole room. Noting that she didn't want to leave the stage yet, Leikeli47 asked how much time she had left — to the crowd's delight, she had enough time to close out with "F*ck the Summer Up."
 
While we may not be in summer yet, fans left the Velvet Underground sweating, danced out and captivated by the levels of intersectionality that took place all because of one masked woman, Leikeli47.